Hello, World

lookatthisstory:

image

Introducing: LOOK AT THIS

These are stories about how you see the world - sometimes having to do with photography, sometimes not. 

We’ll be answering questions and asking them, too. For example: What should we look at next? Send us something weird:

lookatthis@npr.org

@lookatthisstory

#looksgood,
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- Claire

My friends over at NPR’s multimedia desk have launched a new visual tumblr called Look At This! You should do what the title says, and then follow.

More images of Spinosaurus - the swimming dinosaur revealed by National Geographic this week. Apparently, when it wasn’t swimming, it walked on its knuckles.

You can hear NPR’s story about it here.

AAAAND … you can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12. Seriously, they’ve got a lot of stuff about this dinosaur.

"What’d you do today Frank?"
"I built a dinosaur."
This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.
The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.

"What’d you do today Frank?"

"I built a dinosaur."

This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.

The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.

We’ve tried lots of strategies for getting salmon over dams to their spawning grounds — fish ladders, fish elevators, fish trucks … even fish helicopters. But all of those methods are expensive and none of them are efficient.

Enter the salmon cannon.

(This reminds me of the old joke: What did the fish say when it ran into a wall? “Dam.”

Maybe they’ll have to change the punchline to “Shoot.”)

The blooming of an Amorphophallus titanum (AKA corpse flower AKA titan arum) at The Huntington Library last week inspired me!

If you think humans jump through a lot of hoops just to reproduce, check out this plant. It waits 7-10 years, storing up starch in a giant tuber, just so it can bloom for a single day. Then it pretends to be a hunk of rotting meat to attract insect pollinators. Then, months later, it switches tactics to a produce a sweet fruit so birds will disperse it’s seeds.

If you have never smelled a titan arum but for some odd reason you would like to … you are in … luck? Scientists have identified the exact malodorous chemicals that come off these strange flowers to attract pollinators - so you can create the scent at home!*

*please, for your own sake, don’t try this at home.