Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

ICYMI! A rather shaky time lapse of last night’s blood moon taken from NASA’s live feed (recorded at the Griffith Observatory in LA).
And … for good measure - this now-irrelevant but still-ridiculous song:

ICYMI! A rather shaky time lapse of last night’s blood moon taken from NASA’s live feed (recorded at the Griffith Observatory in LA).

And … for good measure - this now-irrelevant but still-ridiculous song:

A musical reminder of tonight’s full lunar eclipse!

Tonight, for the first time since 2011, folks in North America will get the chance to see a total lunar eclipse.  It’s supposed to start in earnest around 2 a.m. on the East Coast (11 p.m. West Coast).

Unfortunately I think clouds will spoil the fun for me (and most people on the east coast). But I woke with this song stuck in my head and ended up recording it with my phone before I headed out for work. (My sincerest apologies to Bonnie Tyler).

You can find more detailed information about the eclipse here.

And if you miss it this time, good news: Another blood moon is forecast for October, and again next April.

The eclipse photo I use in the video was taken in 2011 by Fred Espenak (NASA Marshall Space Center).

The modelers have become models! If you are into climate scientists, you might want to purchase this calendar (created by science communicators Francesco Fiondella and Rebecca Fowler). They explain:

Each month, the calendar shows one of Columbia’s renowned climate scientists in a portrayal of their interests and work, along with information like the scientists’ favorite dataset, chart or climate phenomenon. The calendar also includes dates of weather and climate events that live in infamy, dates of key scientific meetings… and much more.

Images:

Dr. August: Kátia Fernandes developed a model to help predict fire activity in the Western Amazon up to three months in advance. 

Dr. December: Nicolas Vigaud studies how a changing climate could alter regional atmospheric circulation over Africa’s Sahel and other semi-arid environments, and impact rainfall patterns there.

Dr. October: Dorothy Peteet, reconstructs past climate using ancient seeds and pollen found in the cores of layered mud she pulls from bogs, lakes and marshes in Alaska and New York.

Dr. June: Tony Barnston is the Chief Forecaster at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society.

[insert global warming joke that conflates heat and attractiveness here]