Hello, World

lookatthisstory:

image

Introducing: LOOK AT THIS

These are stories about how you see the world - sometimes having to do with photography, sometimes not. 

We’ll be answering questions and asking them, too. For example: What should we look at next? Send us something weird:

lookatthis@npr.org

@lookatthisstory

#looksgood,
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- Claire

My friends over at NPR’s multimedia desk have launched a new visual tumblr called Look At This! You should do what the title says, and then follow.

More images of Spinosaurus - the swimming dinosaur revealed by National Geographic this week. Apparently, when it wasn’t swimming, it walked on its knuckles.

You can hear NPR’s story about it here.

AAAAND … you can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12. Seriously, they’ve got a lot of stuff about this dinosaur.

"What’d you do today Frank?"
"I built a dinosaur."
This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.
The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.

"What’d you do today Frank?"

"I built a dinosaur."

This is the skeleton of a Spinosaurus. It was a predator longer than the T. Rex … and it could swim. It lived in North Africa a hundred million years ago and mostly ate enormous fish.

The image comes National Geographic. You can get more info in the October edition of National Geographic magazine, watch National Geographic/NOVA special airing on PBS Nov. 5 at 9 p.m, or visit the exhibit at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, D.C., starting Sept. 12.

We’ve tried lots of strategies for getting salmon over dams to their spawning grounds — fish ladders, fish elevators, fish trucks … even fish helicopters. But all of those methods are expensive and none of them are efficient.

Enter the salmon cannon.

(This reminds me of the old joke: What did the fish say when it ran into a wall? “Dam.”

Maybe they’ll have to change the punchline to “Shoot.”)